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I’m 32 and Asked Derms What I Should Do to My Skin—Here’s What They Said

For the daytime, Ross recommends a hyaluronic acid and/or a vitamin C product which provides deep hydration and triggers collagen production, respectively. SPF is super important for the daytime, too, as UV rays can put you at risk for skin cancer and can accelerate skin aging. Rhee suggests looking for prebiotic and probiotic ingredients like algae, xylitol, rhamnose, and lactobacillus, vitreoscilla, and various ferments, which work together to balance the your skin’s pH levels and strengthen the skin’s ability to fight against environmental pollutants.

And lastly, make sure your skincare is backed by science and that it does exactly what it’s supposed to do. “In order for a molecule to be effective, skincare ingredients need to be the right size to penetrate the epidermis and effectively absorb into the layers of the skin where it needs to be active,” Rhee says. “A lot of the molecules we know and love are inherently unstable, and if they aren’t stabilized through their formulation, all the dedication to your routine can go to waste because the active ingredients are unlikely to work as intended. This is also the case when you layer certain products. Some ingredients can destabilize and/or inactivate others.” Working with a dermatologist or other professional can help you figure out if the products you’re using are effective or not.

Take a look at some anti-aging creams the dermatologists and some of our editors recommend below.


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