Fashion

Doja Cat’s Creative Director Brett Alan Nelson on Their Prolific Partnership

For the video “Get Into It (Yuh),” we’ve got some incredible space galaxy moments. It’s so creative and interesting in a way that it really feels like art. Can you walk me through that process and concept? And do you ever get to a moment where you’re like, “Oh, no, we need one more look”? Is it really sorted all before you get on set?

I trained under B. Akerlund, who is a god, and she would have five hotel rooms filled with clothes, but I just can’t prep like that. It stresses me out. It costs so much money. She does what she does, and she’s the queen at it, and I grovel to her feet. But for this video, in particular, Doja, again, had a very short idea where she was like, “I want to build a story line about an alien stealing my cat.” And so that’s what [the director] Mike Diva did. And that video, for me… I don’t know if this movie rings true—and Mike would probably kill me for saying this—but Zenon: Girl of the 21st Century, it’s like a more highbrow version of that. When it came to the costuming, I had a collaboration with Michael Schmidt. I just wanted to build this queen-commander look that didn’t feel too masculine. For Doja, if she was the queen of Planet Her, which she is, we want something that feels sexy and cool. We 3D-scanned her body and molded this white bust piece on her that had this almost Victorian hoop that goes around her back. Originally, the clear parts that she ended up keeping were not supposed to be there. It was supposed to be skin. She’s like, “No, I want to keep it clear.” And I was a little nervous about it at first, but it felt like armor, which made it feel more commander, and it was perfectly paired with this beautiful pink satin. And then I got a pair of Pleaser 10-inch pumps that I just covered in fabric so they looked like a huge wedge.

How do you know how to do that?

Honestly, I fake it till I make it every time. I feel like I always have ideas of things that I know will work, and when I go to these people that I’m collaborating with, they’re like, “It’s not gonna work.” But I go back and I’m like, “You can’t tell me it’s not gonna work if we don’t try it.” I will always want to take the risk of doing something that feels iconic because, for me, in the grand scheme of things—like when we’re on our world tour—I want all of these looks in glass boxes. I want people to go back and remember. It’s the Gaga effect. You want people to see these amazing creations that people have built because they are museum-worthy art pieces. 


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